From Washington to the World

Help grow our local solutions for a better world.

Our work in Washington not only impacts our state's natural treasures but extends to scale beyond our borders. In turn, we leverage lessons from The Nature Conservancy's global presence to influence our efforts here at home. Browse the projects below to find out how we're going global with science-based solutions.

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 An orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia. Photo credit: © Katie Hawk

An orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia. Photo credit: © Katie Hawk

From our temperate rainforests to the tropical rainforests of Indonesia, we are working with local and national level partners to ensure that rainforests, the wildlife and the people who depend on them can continue to thrive.

 

From the Pacific Coast to Brazil and Tanzania, the Nature Conservancy partners to ensure Indigenous People have the power to create a prosperous future, using and restoring the natural resources they’ve depended upon for centuries.

 Restoration efforts in a forest near Brazil's Pot-Kro Village. Photo by Kevin Arnold.

Restoration efforts in a forest near Brazil's Pot-Kro Village. Photo by Kevin Arnold.

 Divers stand atop an artificial reef in Grenville Bay, Grenada. Photo by Tim Calver.

Divers stand atop an artificial reef in Grenville Bay, Grenada. Photo by Tim Calver.

Carbon emissions reductions are essential to meet the urgent challenge of climate change. Natural solutions are also essential, able to achieve more than 1/3 of global carbon reduction goals. Our work in Washington's forests and along our coasts are scaling up to climate action in the US and beyond.

 

As our urban spaces continue to grow in density, we are faced with challenges that we can address in concert from Seattle to Shanghai. Bringing nature back is a key approach to making our cities healthier and more livable.

The Brightside Organization, The Nature Conservancy, UPS and Brown-Forman partnered to plant 150 trees along West Broadway from 20th Street to the end at Shawnee Park in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo credit: © The Nature Conservancy (Devan King)

 Harvesting seaweed in Liya village on the island of Wangi Wangi in Indonesia. Photo by Bridget Besaw.

Harvesting seaweed in Liya village on the island of Wangi Wangi in Indonesia. Photo by Bridget Besaw.

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food industry on the planet and may offer habitat and water quality benefits. We're pioneering restorative aquaculture in Washington, alongside projects in Indonesia, Belize, Virginia and California. At home and around the world, science and community partnerships are our springboards.

Conservation is fueled by people who care. Thanks to our caring members, The Nature Conservancy can relentlessly pursue solutions to the most pressing conservation challenges. And private donors who can afford to give more often make a tremendous, timely difference for nature and people in Washington and around the world.

 Washington contributed significant funding to the 19-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest Agreement. Photo by John McCormack.

Washington contributed significant funding to the 19-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest Agreement. Photo by John McCormack.


Featured Video

The Nature Conservancy is celebrating 10 amazing years conserving nature in Africa! Take a look to see a few of the incredible accomplishments that benefit people and nature.