Celebrating our Members in Washington and Around the World

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We think it’s fair to say that we have a reputation for being collaborative, trustworthy, experienced, connected, reliable, practical, innovative — in a word: effective. We’re proud that these attributes inspire people to support our work. We also appreciate that our members and supporters made possible the steady work and impressive results that earned our positive reputation.

We owe our success to our members. Residents of the Evergreen State have been strong supporters of the Conservancy since the Washington chapter was founded in 1959. Today, more than 30,000 households across Washington join nearly 1 million members worldwide who share our vision and want to help create a thriving future for nature and people.

Thank you, members! Your commitment allows our Washington chapter to collaborate with the wider world, sharing ideas and resources to help solve our planet's most pressing conservation challenges.

 A Kermode bear or "spirit bear" (Ursus americanus kermodei) on Gribbell Island in the Great Bear Rainforest of Canada. The 21-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest is the largest coastal temperate rainforest on Earth. Photo by Jon McCormack.

A Kermode bear or "spirit bear" (Ursus americanus kermodei) on Gribbell Island in the Great Bear Rainforest of Canada. The 21-million-acre Great Bear Rainforest is the largest coastal temperate rainforest on Earth. Photo by Jon McCormack.

On top of the collective power of our membership base, generous private donors have been vital conservation partners. Such supporters in Washington have stepped up when additional funds were needed to protect special places, restore specific habitat, pursue cutting-edge science projects and launch new collaborations that broke through old barriers. Their investments are benefiting nature and people around the world — in other U.S. states, Canada, Africa, Chile, China, Indonesia, India and many more places. Right here in Washington, a strong philanthropic tradition has left a tangible conservation legacy that we can all enjoy today.

 Our Ellsworth Preserve in Southwest Washington protects old-growth forest and provides critical habitat for salmon, amphibians, birds and other species. Photo by G. Thomas Corsini.

Our Ellsworth Preserve in Southwest Washington protects old-growth forest and provides critical habitat for salmon, amphibians, birds and other species. Photo by G. Thomas Corsini.

For effective conservation, as with so many things, money matters — and so has the incredible support of Conservancy members and donors here in Washington. Our sincere thanks to all our neighbors who have put their money where their mouth — and heart — is.

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