olympia

Trustees Speak up for Nature in Olympia

Trustees Speak up for Nature in Olympia

Trustees from across Washington state traveled to Olympia to advocate for nature and people at the Legislature, meeting with leaders from both political parties and both chambers to discuss climate change, forest health, Puget Sound recovery and equity in addressing environmental challenges.

Canoe Journeys

Photographed by Joel Rogers, Northwest Photographer

Canoe pullers from Tribes and First Nations in Washington and British Columbia arrived at Port Townsend on Saturday, July 23, as part of the Canoe Journey 2016--Paddle to Nisqually.

The journey ends at Swantown Marina in Olympia Saturday, July 30.

For thousands of years the indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest have voyaged in ocean-going canoes. Todays Tribes and First Nations celebrate the strength of their culture with these annual Canoe Journeys, traveling the ancient routes.

Senate Capital Budget Eliminates Programs that Help Nature and People    Statement from Mike Stevens, Washington State Director for The Nature Conservancy Photograph by Bridget Besaw  
 OLYMPIA—The Nature Conservancy released the following statement from its Washington State Director, Mike Stevens, regarding today’s release of the State Senate’s proposed capital budget.
 
  “We are disappointed that the State Senate cut or eliminated so many programs in their proposed capital budget that would have benefited communities and people. Conservation of our state’s lands and waters not only protects wildlife and clean drinking water, but also helps protect our communities from the increasing fires, floods and droughts that our state is already experiencing.”
 
  “We are particularly troubled by the Senate’s proposal to eliminate the Floodplains by Design program, a multi-benefits approach to flood risk reduction, habitat protection and recreational access that helps protect communities against catastrophic flood events in a cost effective way. We have seen this innovative approach transform the way cities, counties and the state do business to the benefit of communities and taxpayers. With the House proposing increased funding in recognition of the program’s effectiveness, we respectfully suggest that the Senate has missed the mark by zeroing out this critical program.”
 
  “Additionally, the Senate’s proposal to remove all habitat projects from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program would set our state back. Our state is attractive to businesses like Amazon and Boeing in part because of the great outdoors, protected in part through the Wildlife and Recreation Program. With Washington’s population exploding over the next decade, it is critical for us to invest early and often in our great outdoors to ensure that our kids and grandkids enjoy the same quality of life and access to the outdoors that we do.”
 
  “We are also concerned about the Senate’s deep cuts to clean water and salmon protection programs like the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Program and the Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program. Slowing the pace of restoration for our state’s waters could set us back.”
 
  “The Senate budget even reduces funding from the Washington Coastal Restoration Initiative from the Houses’ proposal of $8.2 million, a locally driven effort by a coalition of fishermen, local businesses, county commissioners and tribes to restore coastal forests and streams in a region with some of the highest unemployment in the state.”
 
  “We recognize that there were many difficult budget decisions to be made, but these cuts will cost our state more in both the short and long term. Our scientists and field staff in every corner of the state are witnessing the increased impacts of drought, wildfires and flooding on Washington communities, businesses and families. Stepping back from innovative, cost-effective natural solutions right now bodes poorly for our communities and economies. We urge elected leaders to take note and restore funding for these critical programs”

Senate Capital Budget Eliminates Programs that Help Nature and People

Statement from Mike Stevens, Washington State Director for The Nature Conservancy
Photograph by Bridget Besaw

OLYMPIA—The Nature Conservancy released the following statement from its Washington State Director, Mike Stevens, regarding today’s release of the State Senate’s proposed capital budget.

“We are disappointed that the State Senate cut or eliminated so many programs in their proposed capital budget that would have benefited communities and people. Conservation of our state’s lands and waters not only protects wildlife and clean drinking water, but also helps protect our communities from the increasing fires, floods and droughts that our state is already experiencing.”

“We are particularly troubled by the Senate’s proposal to eliminate the Floodplains by Design program, a multi-benefits approach to flood risk reduction, habitat protection and recreational access that helps protect communities against catastrophic flood events in a cost effective way. We have seen this innovative approach transform the way cities, counties and the state do business to the benefit of communities and taxpayers. With the House proposing increased funding in recognition of the program’s effectiveness, we respectfully suggest that the Senate has missed the mark by zeroing out this critical program.”

“Additionally, the Senate’s proposal to remove all habitat projects from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program would set our state back. Our state is attractive to businesses like Amazon and Boeing in part because of the great outdoors, protected in part through the Wildlife and Recreation Program. With Washington’s population exploding over the next decade, it is critical for us to invest early and often in our great outdoors to ensure that our kids and grandkids enjoy the same quality of life and access to the outdoors that we do.”

“We are also concerned about the Senate’s deep cuts to clean water and salmon protection programs like the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Program and the Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program. Slowing the pace of restoration for our state’s waters could set us back.”

“The Senate budget even reduces funding from the Washington Coastal Restoration Initiative from the Houses’ proposal of $8.2 million, a locally driven effort by a coalition of fishermen, local businesses, county commissioners and tribes to restore coastal forests and streams in a region with some of the highest unemployment in the state.”

“We recognize that there were many difficult budget decisions to be made, but these cuts will cost our state more in both the short and long term. Our scientists and field staff in every corner of the state are witnessing the increased impacts of drought, wildfires and flooding on Washington communities, businesses and families. Stepping back from innovative, cost-effective natural solutions right now bodes poorly for our communities and economies. We urge elected leaders to take note and restore funding for these critical programs”

It’s Wild & Scenic!   After years of advocacy, The Nature Conservancy is pleased to share the news that Congress recently approved designation of Illabot Creek as a National Wild and Scenic River. Illabot Creek is a tributary to the Skagit River and home to a night roost for eagles and one of the most important salmon spawning grounds in Puget Sound.  The Nature Conservancy has been working to protect the mighty Skagit River for more than 30 years, so that migrating birds, bald eagles, legendary Skagit salmon runs and the iconic beauty of the Northwest will be there for future generations. 
 In the words of TNC’s director of strategic partnerships, Bob Carey, “Illabot Creek is one of the few places in the state where you can still really see what the old-timers meant when they would say they could once walk across the backs of salmon.” 
 Thanks to the hard work and leadership of  Senator Patty Murray, Senator Maria Cantwell, Representative Rick Larsen  and  Representative Suzan DelBene , Illabot Creek finally has the protection it deserves. 
 Please take a few moments to send these champions of nature a quick thanks for their tireless efforts to protect this special place: 




   US Senator Patty Murray   






   US Senator Maria Cantwell   








   US Congresswoman Suzan DelBene   






   US Congressman Rick Larsen

It’s Wild & Scenic!

After years of advocacy, The Nature Conservancy is pleased to share the news that Congress recently approved designation of Illabot Creek as a National Wild and Scenic River. Illabot Creek is a tributary to the Skagit River and home to a night roost for eagles and one of the most important salmon spawning grounds in Puget Sound.

The Nature Conservancy has been working to protect the mighty Skagit River for more than 30 years, so that migrating birds, bald eagles, legendary Skagit salmon runs and the iconic beauty of the Northwest will be there for future generations.

In the words of TNC’s director of strategic partnerships, Bob Carey, “Illabot Creek is one of the few places in the state where you can still really see what the old-timers meant when they would say they could once walk across the backs of salmon.”

Thanks to the hard work and leadership of Senator Patty Murray, Senator Maria Cantwell, Representative Rick Larsen and Representative Suzan DelBene, Illabot Creek finally has the protection it deserves.

Please take a few moments to send these champions of nature a quick thanks for their tireless efforts to protect this special place:

US Senator Patty Murray

US Senator Maria Cantwell

US Congresswoman Suzan DelBene

US Congressman Rick Larsen

FAMILY DINNER IN OLYMPIA  It felt more like a family dinner than a legislative event. The recent Tribal dinner at Washington’s Capital Building featured some big names, including Governor Jay Inslee, legislators, agency directors and more than a dozen tribal leaders. But despite all the titles, the evening had the air of a family reunion complete with storytelling and friendly banter. The Nature Conservancy in Washington was honored to be invited to this gathering.  As tribal leaders rose to introduce themselves, share stories and joke with other tribes, it was easy to see the importance of community. We are in this together. All of us, from tribal members to legislators to Nature Conservancy leaders, believe in the value of nature in our state. Working together as a community, we are better positioned to solve tough environmental challenges, carry out innovative programs and find the best ways to care for people and nature. 
 Our inclusion at the Tribal dinner was an honor and recognition of the value we put in our relationship with our region’s tribes. Their partnership is vital to our work in communities and nature. Their history, knowledge and insights lead us towards creative solutions that preserve nature and support communities. We can’t do it without them and were thrilled to be a guest at their family dinner.

FAMILY DINNER IN OLYMPIA

It felt more like a family dinner than a legislative event. The recent Tribal dinner at Washington’s Capital Building featured some big names, including Governor Jay Inslee, legislators, agency directors and more than a dozen tribal leaders. But despite all the titles, the evening had the air of a family reunion complete with storytelling and friendly banter. The Nature Conservancy in Washington was honored to be invited to this gathering.

As tribal leaders rose to introduce themselves, share stories and joke with other tribes, it was easy to see the importance of community. We are in this together. All of us, from tribal members to legislators to Nature Conservancy leaders, believe in the value of nature in our state. Working together as a community, we are better positioned to solve tough environmental challenges, carry out innovative programs and find the best ways to care for people and nature.

Our inclusion at the Tribal dinner was an honor and recognition of the value we put in our relationship with our region’s tribes. Their partnership is vital to our work in communities and nature. Their history, knowledge and insights lead us towards creative solutions that preserve nature and support communities. We can’t do it without them and were thrilled to be a guest at their family dinner.