Your 'Rock Our World' Campaign:

July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016

 

Thanks to supporters and partners like you, we made great strides toward our conservation vision this past year.

We deepened existing partnerships and established powerful new connections with communities, tribes, businesses, governments and individuals. We collaborated to advance conservation through science, on-the-ground protection and restoration, promoting big ideas, seeking common ground, and influencing public policy—all in search of innovative solutions to our most pressing conservation challenges. These efforts and conversations continue as we transform the relationship between nature and people.

Year One Highlights

 

350,000 Forest Acres Restored or in the Queue 

for on-the-ground work by The Nature Conservancy and its forest management partners

 

10 Fire-Adapted Communities Supported

by the growing Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network

1,200 Acres Transferred

to the U.S. Forest Service along the Pacific Crest Trail for permanent protection and public enjoyment

120,000 Trees Planted 

on restoration sites, including areas catastrophically burned in recent years

Year One Highlights

700 Pieces of Abandoned Gear Removed 

across 150 square miles of ocean, in partnership with tribal fishermen, to protect marine life from old fishing pots, buoys and nets

 

$11M for Coastal Restoration Delivered

to 22 community-driven projects that improve coastal waters while generating jobs—inspiring an impressive suite of new proposals that promise tangible conservation and economic benefits for Washington’s coastal communities

1 Innovative Design Approved

for testing in areas currently closed to fishing—a key step in finding out if the experimental gear can really help fishermen harvest plentiful fish without catching those in short supply

FISHING IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF MY FAMILY AND TRIBAL HERITAGE. THIS PROVIDES ME WITH AN OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND OUR QUILEUTE COMMUNITY FISH MARKET IN A SUSTAINABLE WAY AND KEEP THE PROFITS WITHIN OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY.
— EMILY FOSTER, one of the winners in the first annual Washington Coast Works Sustainable Small Business Competition promoting triple-bottom-line business development for small coastal communities through an intensive eight-week training and startup funds for three winners

Year One Highlights

29 River Projects Underway or Completed

through the Floodplains by Design program, benefitting Puget Sound communities and salmon by reducing flood risks and restoring habitat—while also supporting better water quality, local food production and recreation

56 Floodplains Projects Proposed

by communities across Washington for the next round of Floodplains by Design funding—a record response that demonstrates strong interest in making communities safer and rivers healthier

$14M in Public Funds Committed

to an innovative new program—initiated and supported by Nature Conservancy staff—that benefits at-risk salmon and shellfish via strategic investments in working Puget Sound farmlands

Year One Highlights

200 Decision-makers
Galvanized 

at the Puget Sound region’s first Green Infrastructure Summit and at stormwater leader meetings, including elected officials and representatives from local governments, non-profit organizations, engineering firms, businesses and academic institutions

40 Years-worth of Studies Synthesized

in the groundbreaking Outside Our Doors report, available online and widely distributed to promote the benefits of nature to people in cities

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY IS BRINGING A WEALTH OF STRATEGIC THINKING AND INNOVATION TO OUR REGION’S STORMWATER POLLUTION CHALLENGE. THEIR ABILITY TO SEE THE BIG PICTURE, BRING KEY PERSPECTIVES TO THE TABLE, AND MOVE QUICKLY TO PRODUCE PRAGMATIC TOOLS IS HELPING US TRANSCEND ORGANIZATIONAL AND SECTOR-RELATED SILOS AND ACCELERATE HIGH-VALUE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE APPROACHES.
— PAM EMERSON, Green Infrastructure Policy Advisor for the City of Seattle and regional expert on the challenge of stormwater run-off pollution, which is the number one threat to the health of Puget Sound

Year One Highlights

OUR LAND, OCEAN, WATER AND CITIES strategies ALL HELP PREPARE WASHINGTON’S COMMUNITIES AND WILDLIFE HABITAT FOR THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE. ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR CLIMATE WORK THIS PAST YEAR INCLUDE:

43,000

STUDENTS AT 588 SCHOOLS EDUCATED

about Puget Sound climate science through a ‘Newspapers in Education’ partnership with The Seattle Times, with classroom content based on a comprehensive report released by the Conservancy and the UW Climate Impacts Group; media coverage of the original report plus broad distribution of the student materials reached more than 1.5 million potential readers/viewers

67%

of VoterS
Confirmed

to support climate action that invests in clean water and forests, in polling conducted by The Nature Conservancy

1

Comprehensive Water Study Championed

by the Conservancy resulted in a State Legislative commitment to determine how climate change will impact water supplies across the state, and how communities might adapt

 
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116,300

Social Media Supporters
spread our stories and advocate for nature

1,700 

Volunteers
contributed more than 4,500 hours of their time

34,600  

Nature Conservancy Members
in Washington provide the annual support we need to advance conservation throughout the state

 

First Nations Are Driving Conservation

in an extraordinary collaboration with the Conservancy’s Emerald Edge Program, which spans the coast from Washington to Alaska; the ambitious agenda includes permanently protecting 300,000 acres of old-growth forest while supporting a sustainable economic and cultural future in Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island

Elephant and Community Health Advanced in Africa 

as the Conservancy’s Washington Chapter continued to support and connect potential investors to efforts—in places like Kenya, Zambia and Tanzania—to help local communities co-exist with and protect iconic wildlife while also improving their lands, waters and economic opportunities

India Country Program Established 

to help address the recognized need to ‘develop without destruction’ and balance economic development with the sustainable management of resources; the new program was developed with significant support and guidance by Washington Chapter staff, volunteers and donors, and brings the number of countries where the Conservancy works to nearly 70

EMERALD EDGE SETS THE STANDARD FOR AUTHENTIC, COLLABORATIVE WORK THAT RESPECTS INDIGENOUS RIGHTS-HOLDERS AND EMPOWERS CONSERVATION AT A SCALE THAT MAKES SENSE. I APPRECIATE SUCH PARTNERS WHO ARE READY TO INNOVATE AND ELEVATE LOCAL LEADERSHIP TO ENSURE TRULY REGIONAL IMPACT.
— JESS HOUSTY, Communications Director for Qqs ("Eyes") Projects Society, a Heiltsuk First Nation nonprofit organization supporting youth, culture and environment