Supporting the Roots of Our Cities: Funding for Trees

Tackling stormwater in Puget Sound is an all-hands-on-deck situation.  Organizations throughout the Puget Sound region are using innovative and creative solutions to address this challenge that continues to be the No. 1 polluter of our waterways.

Planting seedlings at North Creek Forest with Whale Scout volunteers in October 2018. © Hannah Letinich

Did you walk by a tree today? Then you walked by a green-infrastructure solution for addressing stormwater and providing many other benefits for humans and habitat. 

The challenge of stormwater pollution and its impact on our Puget Sound is significant. But organizations, agencies and individuals throughout Puget Sound are using innovative and creative solutions to address the No. 1 polluter to our creeks, lakes and waterways.

Planting trees at Hawthorne Elementary in Seattle in October 2018. © Hannah Letinich

Trees in urban areas — especially those close to impervious surfaces — reduce stormwater pollution by intercepting water before it hits the ground and helping it infiltrate the soil if it does hit the ground.

Today, The Nature Conservancy, in partnership with City Habitats, is releasing a Request for Proposals to support the capacity of local organizations to implement tree planting throughout Puget Sound urban areas, including on public and private lands

We are seeking projects that will enhance the urban forest canopy, with specific focus on contributing to positive stormwater management, human wellbeing and other benefits.  Check out the projects previously funded through this opportunity.

Seedlings planted at North Creek Forest with Whale Scout volunteers in October 2018. © Hannah Letinich

Up to $250,000 in funding will be distributed through this request for proposals supporting both the planning and implementation phases of tree planting efforts.

Proposals are due Feb. 27.  View the full Request for Proposal for more information.

Learn More About Our Work in Puget Sound Cities