Op-Ed: Indigenous Knowledge is Scientific Knowledge

 At this vantage point overlooking the Pacific Ocean at Neah Bay, TJ Greene looks toward Ozette, the southernmost historic village of the Makah Tribe. Photo by Cameron Karsten.

At this vantage point overlooking the Pacific Ocean at Neah Bay, TJ Greene looks toward Ozette, the southernmost historic village of the Makah Tribe. Photo by Cameron Karsten.

This weekend, our trustee TJ Greene, former chairman of the Makah Tribe, will speak at Seattle's March for Science. The theme of this year's march is "Science's Silenced Voices," and in an op-ed in today's Seattle Times, TJ reflects on the pivotal connection between indigenous knowledge and scientific observation.

"Indigenous peoples have lived in our particular locations for many generations, and we define ourselves in relation to our home environment. Our deep and long-standing relationships with the environment are unique; our very existence depends on our ability to conserve and maintain our lands and waters for future generations," TJ writes.

Visit the Seattle Times for TJ's thoughts on combining indigenous knowledge with western science for the greatest chance at solving the world's most pressing environmental challenges.